London Fashion Week Mens SS18

London Fashion Week Mens SS18

Get the low down on all of Toni&Guy’s shows at LFWM

London Fashion Week Men’s (LFWM) celebrated its fifth anniversary with a SS18 outing that was as diverse as the city itself. Designers offered strong style statements ranging from smart suits through to gender-neutral gowns via luxurious sportswear and much more. This season also saw Toni&Guy become official sponsors of LFWM and label.m become its official hair partner. This is a natural progression for Toni&Guy following over a decade of support for LFW, and further cements its intrinsic relationship with the capital’s fashion scene. As always, Toni&Guy’s International Artistic Directors and session team went backstage to create trend-setting looks for several shows. Here’s what went down. 


The Fashion
Patrick Grant wasn’t afraid to let his men show off their knobbly knees in a collection inspired by New Romantic pop band Japan and their 1979 album Quiet Life. Wide double-breasted jackets, loose tab-collar shirts, high-waisted denim shorts and bomber jackets in neutral shades all felt extra-comfortable. Gentle stripes, skinny ties and geeky glasses added to the retro vibe.

The Hair
Philipp Haug focussed on hair with natural movement and a loose, healthy finish. The team applied label.m Sea Salt Spray to hair, and then used fingers to sweep it back into a parting. Hair was blown away from the face to create height and gently secured with label.m Hairspray.



The Fashion
John Smedley marked his LFWM catwalk debut with Precision/Fluidity – a collection of minimal, functional pieces. Luxurious jumpers, merino wool suits and polo tops featured Japanese Koi prints and embroideries. Women walked in kimono-style dresses, jackets and long skirts. A pure and practical offering.

The hair
Cos Sakkas ensured hair was ‘both understated and typically British’ by creating gender-neutral looks. The team applied label.m Volume Mousse onto dry hair and blasted it with a label.m Tourmaline Dryer. Then label.men Deconstructor was worked through the mid to end lengths to enhance separation and shine.




The Fashion
Matthew Miller perversely chose a church to present his collection, Degeneration. Besmirched models looked like they’d just emerged from a dungeon Goth club covered in harnesses and buckles. But these theatrics didn’t distract from some impeccable tailoring including rubber-bonded raincoats and sharply angled tuxedos.

The Hair
Chie Sato gave hair “underlying erotic movement” by applying label.m Hold & Gloss Spray section by section from roots to mid-lengths, then placing section into shapes held with small clips. Hair was diffused with a label.m Magic Diffuser, and the ends secured to the side in a criss-cross pattern. A spray of label.m Fashion Edition Wax Spray close to the hair created a wet look.


The Fashion
This second collection from Tinie Tempah was entitled Bring Your Game and the grime star did just that. Presented on a makeshift basketball court, his diverse cast of models dribbled and dunked while wearing PVC and corduroy jackets, denim shirts and zip up tracksuits in shades of baby blue, black, chocolate and peach.

The Hair
Dexter Johnson aimed for versatile hair in keeping with each model’s individuality. “We incorporated subtle touches by clippering, shaping and finishing hair in a way that enhanced the natural texture of each person’s hair,” he says. The team applied label.m Hold & Gloss Spray to wet hair, then roughly dried it, continuing to layer to achieve a waxy texture. Hair was finished with label.men Deconstructor to encourage separation.



The Fashion
Hussein Chalayan proved his worth as one of London’s most cerebral designers with this collection that pulled apart traditional suits and kimonos and morphed them back together again. Entitled Momentum, shirts with arm openings, shorts with knife pleats, ribbon-festooned shirts, drawstring jackets and trousers with peekaboo patches felt sports fresh.

The hair
“The hair complimented the collection with a classic, slicked back look and a 90s punk edge,” says Chie Sato. Prepping hair with label.men Thickening Tonic and combing through using a label.m Wide Tooth Comb, hair was separated using clips to add height and set with a label.m Magic Diffuser. For additional shine, label.m Hold & Gloss Spray was applied and the clips removed.

 





The fashion
St James’s reinforced its reputation as London’s menswear hub with a group show featuring many of the brands that call this enclave home, ranging from heritage names Turnbull & Asser, New & Lingwood and Lock & Co to newer arrivals Tiger of Sweden, Paul & Shark and Sunspel. The result fused panama hats with blazers, suits with trainers, jumpers with safari jackets and bowties with slippers. Keeping it cohesive was a soft and warm colour palette.

The Hair
Jon Wilsdon worked with each model’s natural texture for an authentic hair offering. The team used label.m Leave In Conditioner to soften hair, label.m Volume Mousse to add texture, label.m Matt Paste to encourage separation and label.m Hairspray to hold.





The Fashion
Design duo Kim Wilkins and photographer Pliny Champion marked the 50th anniversary of the Summer of Love with a collection inspired by the protest marches of that era. Hard met soft as barbed wire prints sat next to floral embroideries and slogan tops decreeing ‘No Fight, No Future’ contrasted with see-through organza combat trousers and elongated knitwear. These were utilitarian looks for hopeful crusaders.

The Hair
“Inspired by the 1960s, hair had easy, undone movement - think a young Mick Jagger,” Philipp Haug says. The session team applied label.m Volume Mousse to wet hair then wrap dried it from side to side using a label.m Cushion Brush and Tourmaline Dryer. Fringes were brushed forward with fingers, and then label.m Matt Paste was lightly applied to roots to encourage separation.



The Fashion
This recent Central Saint Martins graduate combined traditional tailoring with contemporary streetwear to ‘examine what it means to be young and British in 2017.’ Outerwear including trench coats, field jackets and anoraks came in luxe leathers, cotton twill and neoprene. These were worn over singlets and swimwear or alongside close fitting suits.

The Hair
Daniele de Angelis created a lived in look that gave models “the appearance of being a gentleman in the gym”. The team applied label.men Thickening Tonic and then blow dried hair away from the face with a label.m Grooming Brush to create a smooth surface. After that, label.m Souffle was combed through using a label.m Wide Tooth Comb and hair was finished with label.m Hairspray.



The Fashion
Working with the concept of Inevitable Interaction, this South Korean brand made its LFWM debut by bringing together suiting and sportswear with laces, buckles and zips. A palette of white, black and beige was punctuated with a stunning red.

The Hair
Daniele de Angelis brought two elements together too – sharp definition and a matt finish. Hair was prepped using label.m Volume Mousse and dried with a label.m Tourmaline Dryer, then label.m Souffle was worked through with hands to create volume and finished softly with label.m Hairspray.

  • Words: Helen Jennings

  • Photography: Alexander Chai, Cara Brown, Philipp Raheem, Sean Collymore