Film: Blue Is The Warmest Colour

Film: Blue Is The Warmest Colour

Julie Maroh's graphic novel of angst-ridden romance is brought to life on the big screen in full French art house cinematic glory

As expected, there's been plenty of hype around the French sapphic romance Blue is the Warmest Colour. After a rapturous reception at Cannes (Director Abdellatif Kechiche took home the coveted Palme d'Or award), reviews from a wider audience have been mixed. Based on Julie Maroh's graphic novel Le bleu est une couleur chaude, the story follows a teenage Adèle (played by Adèle Exarchopoulos) who experiences a sexual awakening when she meets and falls in love with blue-haired artist Emma (played by Léa Seydoux). A relationship develops and we see their journey from teens to adults, friends to lovers and then ultimately their break up as the relationship spirals and disintegrates.

With strong performances from both leads it's a compelling watch and hard not to feel heartbroken for Adèle towards the end of the film when we see that Emma has made a new life for herself with someone else. But the raw acting on offer is frequently interrupted with marathon sessions of soft-porn style sex scenes that seem entirely juxtaposed with the blossoming love story between the two women. It feels a little *whisper it* gratuitous at points, while a self indulgent running time of 179 minutes stalls the storyline to the point of mundane at times. That said, these niggles are not enough to detract from the sheer intensity of the acting, the fresh approach to what is effectively a traditional coming-of-age tale and the art-house charm it retains throughout. Not to be missed.

Watch the trailer here: