London calling

London calling

The Design Museum pays homage to all things punk

The Design Museum is set to close the doors of its Shad Thames outpost this weekend and it’s going out with a bang, celebrating the anarchic Punk movement of the 70s. We roundup the events not to miss.



1.

Punk Timeline - a chronological history of the Punk movement - will greet visitors from a glass tank at the entrance of the museum. Designed and created with Russell Bestley, a Principal Lecturer in Graphic Design at London College of Communication, the exhibit will chart Punk's relationship with music, its founding ideologies, and the origins of its trademark rebellious attitude.

All weekend, front entrance 

2.

Jewellery designer Katie New will host a jewellery-making workshop, Jewellery with Attitude, where visitors can create pin badges and chain chokers using an assortment of text, images, photos and drawings, as well as scraps of tartan and stud detailing. 

Sunday, DIY Floor, 12.00 - 14.00

3.

Catch Dr Russell Bestley as he talks about Punk beyond the realms of London at Subverting the Weekend.  The London College of Communication lecturer (and member the Punk Scholars Network and author of The Art of Punk) will discuss Punk's dissemination across the world and how it continues to influence in the present day.

Sunday, The Stage, 11.00 - 12.00

 

4.

Bring tatty T-shirts, denim jackets and blazers galore to Punk Customise and transform them into an item of clothing inspired by the DIY ideology of the punk era. Led by fashion designer Lamis Khamis, visitors will be able to upcycle their old clothing using zippers, pins, badges and buckles for a truly thrown-together look. 

Saturday, The Stage, 12.00 - 18.00

 

5.

Marvel at British designer and artist Jamie Reid's extensive collection of photographs, original artworks for gigs, record covers (remember that iconic Never Mind the Bollocks Sex Pistol artwork?) and a Vivienne Westwood screen printed bag. Working alongside Malcolm McLaren, the Sex Pistols manager, Reid is best known for his anarchist approach to his work that still resonates with today’s provocateurs.

All weekend, The Stage

designmuseum.org

  • Words: Rebecca Parker